Last edited by Dujin
Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

1 edition of revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) found in the catalog.

revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

Roy R. Snelling

revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

by Roy R. Snelling

  • 131 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in [Los Angeles] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Honey-ants -- Classification.,
  • Insects -- Classification.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Roy R. Snelling.
    SeriesScience bulletin ; 24, Science bulletin (Los Angeles, Calif.) ;, 24.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH1 .L982 no. 24, QL568.F7 .L982 no. 24
    The Physical Object
    Pagination163 p., [1] leaf of plates :
    Number of Pages163
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4598314M
    LC Control Number77361055

      Less common, but still with plenty of examples especially in tropical areas, are plants that provide shelter for ants. These domatia may be hollow stems, swollen petioles, or other hollow spaces on the plant that ants can use as living space.. A few neotropical shrubs in the large genus Piper (black pepper family) have evolved large, envelope-like petioles that house a species of Pheidole ant. Myrmecophily (/ m ɜːr m ə ˈ k ɒ f ɪ l i / mur-mə-KOF-il-ee; literally "ant-love") is the term applied to positive interspecies associations between ants and a variety of other organisms such as plants, other arthropods, and fungi. Myrmecophily refers to mutualistic associations with ants, though in its more general use the term may also refer to commensal or even parasitic interactions.

    2 Journal \ S Melittology No. na, to whom it is closely related (Engel, ), until such time as a revision of the latter genus is completed. The classification of the Megaloptidia-group genera (as originally recognized by Engel, ) is summarized in Table 1. What was previously considered to belong to a single species of Cleptommation is now recognized to be multiple taxa based on the. A revision of male ants of the Malagasy region (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Key to subfamilies and treatment of the genera of Ponerinae MASASHI YOSHIMURA1 & BRIAN L. FISHER2,3 1 Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Kyushu University, Fukuoka , .

    Numerous butterfly species in the family Lycaenidae maintain myrmecophilous associations with trophobiotic ants, but only a minority of ant-associated butterflies are parasites of ants. Camponotus, Crematogaster, Myrmica, and Oecophylla are the most frequently parasitized ant genera. The distribution of ant-parasitic representatives of the Lycaenidae suggests that only Camponotus Cited by: Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae / f ɔːr ˈ m ɪ s ᵻ d iː / and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the mid-Cretaceous period between and million years ago and diversified after the rise of flowering t of an estimated total of 22, species have been classified.


Share this book
You might also like
Investigating sources

Investigating sources

Treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis as affected by chemotherapy.

Treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis as affected by chemotherapy.

Finance Literature Index (McGraw-Hill Series in Finance)

Finance Literature Index (McGraw-Hill Series in Finance)

What is karate!

What is karate!

I am because you are

I am because you are

Urban fabric

Urban fabric

1000 Islands

1000 Islands

No stairs to climb in London

No stairs to climb in London

Sunshine and health

Sunshine and health

How to attract the wombat

How to attract the wombat

U.S. climate change policy

U.S. climate change policy

Modern trigonometry

Modern trigonometry

picture book of bookbindings

picture book of bookbindings

Revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) by Roy R. Snelling Download PDF EPUB FB2

A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). [Snelling, R R.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).Cited by: Revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

[Los Angeles]: Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Roy R Snelling. Myrmecocystus is a North American genus of ants in the subfamily is one of five genera that includes honeypot ants. Worker ants keep and tend plerergates, which are other ants that store large quantities of nutritious fluid in their abdomens to feed the colony during famine times.

[citation needed].Some species engage in highly territorial tournaments, which can result in Class: Insecta. A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Item Preview. Full text of "A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)." See other formats.

Snelling's series of taxonomic treatments of this interesting genus grouped species into subgenera and, in some cases, species groups within these subgenera. The work presented here is from the revision and a subsequent update of that work in Snelling, R. A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera.

Myrmecocystus mimicus is a North American species of ant in the genus Myrmecocystus. The species is widely distributed, from Kansas south to Texas and Mexico, and west to California.

References External links. Media related to Myrmecocystus mimicus at Wikimedia Commons; This Family: Formicidae. This honeypot ant (genus Myrmecocystus) can store liquid food inside its expandable abdomen.

Consider other ants you are familiar with, and explain how a honeypot ant exemplifies three key features of life: adaptation, unity, and diversity. We would be happy to help you with any queries Phone: +49 30 Tue-Fri ampm, pmpm Hotline is now:5/5(1).

This is the genus of “honey pot” ants in which repletes fill their crops with liquids and hang inside the nests, serving as storage structures.

These “honey pots” are consumed in Mexico. This genus is common in New Mexico, especially in arid and semiarid regions. ant, Myrmecocystus, ant, physiology, dissertation, dissertations, honey ant, Myrmecocystus, physiology, ants, theses, thesis: Abstract: 1.

Critical thermal maxima and minima, temperature preferences and rates of O2 consumption were determined for diurnal and nocturnal species of.

of the honey ants Myrmecocystus mexicanus hortideorum. Annals of the Entomological Society of America C ONWAY, J.R. Notes on repletes, myrmecophiles, and pre. The honey ant Myrmecocystus mimicus is a scavenger, forages extensively on termites, collects floral nectar, and tends homoptera.

Individual foragers of M. mimicus usually disperse in all directions when leaving the nest, but there are also groups of foragers that tend to swarm out of the nest primarily in one direction. Such massive departues are usually at irregular intervals, which may last Cited by: Rissing, S.

Replete caste production and allometry of workers in the honey ant, Myrmecocystus mexicanus wesmael (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society Snelling, R.R.

A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus mexicanus, first supplement (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). A revision of the honey ants, genus.

A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Coffin and Lauenroth, ). Fifty-six mounds of. 1. Field studies of the honey ant Myrmecocystus mimicus have revealed that colonies are often founded by groups of foundresses ranging in size from 2–9 females, with groups of 2–4 females being most common.

Founding nests are also aggregated together in patches which are distant from existing M. minicus colonies. Laboratory experiments have shown that colony founding involves Cited by: This is my list of the books about ants only, about social insects in general or containing info about ants that are in my possession at this moment.

The Ant Farm and Myrmecology Forum. 1, Login; Join; HOME. The Ant Farm and Myrmecology Forum. Discuss anything related to ants from keeping them as pets to removing them as pests.

This page was last edited on 8 Septemberat Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may Snelling. A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus, first supplement (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

Bulletin Southern California Academy of Sciences, 69– Snelling. The taxonomy and distribution of some North American Pogonomyrmex and descriptions of two new species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

10/1-Myrmecocystus sp. naturally feed on insects, honey dew and extrafloral nectar. Honey, real maple surup, sugar water, fruit juice, etc. are easy enough. The trick is providing sufficient insect food of the appropriate type. With the 7 incipient colonies under my care, the minim workers are not able to handle very large insect prey.

Melophorus is an exceptionally diverse ant genus from arid Australia that has received little taxonomic attention, such that just a fraction of its remarkable number of species is described. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization’s Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre (TERC) in Darwin holds by far the most extensive collection of Melophorus, and as of September Cited by: 2.A revision of the honey ants, genus Myrmecocystus, first supplement (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Vol Page 69 A new species of Scolelepis (Polychaeta: Spionidae) from California sandy beaches.Linepithema ants are a common but often overlooked element of the Neotropical myrmecofauna.

These small, monomorphic dolichoderine ants are native to a variety of forest, grassland, and montane habitats in Central and South America and the Caribbean.

The genus is widely recognized for the pestiferous Argentine ant L. humile.